Documenting Before Demolition

An editorial about exploring and documenting history. This comes from a forgotten (no posts since 2020) site of a Manitoba, Canada, explorer. I couldn’t find a name or anything like social media to help find who they are.

Some of you are aware that Canada has never been considered one of the best countries in the world to explore abandoned sites, due to Canada’s national policy for demolition projects of derelict buildings or converting derelict properties over to new owners, often into the hands of non-profit organizations.

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A Book About Ontario Cemeteries and Graveyards

I found a book with photographs and history of Ontario cemeteries and graveyards. There must be some difference between the two, I will look it up later. The book is by Jennifer McKendry. She is a history enthusiast in Kingston, Ontario. On her site she has written about antiques, architecture, old houses, and researching historic properties.… Read the rest

What is an Abandoned Barn Versus Inactive?

I looked at the photos of barns in this post. To me, most of them are inactive, not actually abandoned. They are still maintained, enough to not be falling down, don’t look salvaged for barn boards, etc. So, they didn’t really seem abandoned or derelict. Probably someone else would consider any barn not actively used to be abandoned.… Read the rest

Evidence of Giant People in Ontario History?

What, or who, were the giants, old or prehistoric skeletons found, which are at least seven feet tall? I’ve heard they were redheaded or blonde and described as white/ pale skinned by the native Indians who encountered them in their history.

Could they have been Vikings, certainly we know Vikings did make it to (what is now) Newfoundland in Canada.… Read the rest

A Haunted Tunnel in Ontario?

I haven’t seen this tunnel myself and I’m skeptical about anything being haunted. Still, having a history like this isn’t going to leave a place unmarked, or unremarked upon. Any old train tunnel is going to be dark and too many are unused these days. Not all of them have children crushed by rocks and trains colliding into each other.… Read the rest

Abandoned London, A Book by Katie Wignall

Katie Wignall, is a history blogger and sightseeing tour guide in London, England, UK. She is promoting her book, Abandoned London, about old, disappearing and historical places.

Amazon.ca – Abandoned LondonĀ  – Available July 6, 2021.

Anywhere in Europe will have more, or at least older, places to explore than Ontario. It would be nice to see them.… Read the rest

Toronto Fire 1904 Postcard

I have heard about the fire in old Toronto. So long ago (before I was born) that I forget the year. But, this postcard says it was 1904, and this is where the fire started. None of those old buildings will still be standing. The others which survived in 1904 are mostly gone too. The don’t make them like that any more, is certainly true.… Read the rest

Did you Know About Milk Tokens?

Found at an Etsy shop with this information:

From the late 19th century through the 1960s and 1970s, dairy distributors of Canada issued tokens as monetary substitutes for convenient home delivery. They also served as advertising.

Kemptville, I think, is now part of Barrie, Ontario. So a bit more local history for Ontario. I didn’t know there were tokens like this.… Read the rest

Bench By Bench with Rebecca Kennel

Victoria: Bench by Bench

Another idea for backyard explorers, public benches in parks, along trails, anywhere you can walk to. Some benches have been built for people to take a break during a walk. Some give people a place to sit, read awhile and admire the scenery or a great view. Some were donated as memorials with a plaque for a family member, local business or celebrity.… Read the rest

Steve Skafte – Poet and Explorer of Roads, Cemeteries and Old Places in Nova Scotia

I found Steve Skafte (YouTube video posts) today from a post on the CBC site. He was interviewed about his photographs and research of abandoned roads in Nova Scotia.

When he was a kid, his bedroom walls were covered in maps. He was fascinated with exploring Nova Scotia, so once he travelled all the roads he could track down in his community, his attention shifted to the roads that weren’t clearly marked.

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